Happy to Be Proven Wrong!

by John Lawrence

Sometimes, when you go out on a limb, you’re going to have a rough landing.  In the last DOMEocracy, I predicted that “the House will pass something [on health care] that the President will define as ‘amazing.’” I have never been as pleased to say: “I was wrong! Mea culpa!” I have never been happier to have been proven a faulty seer.

I should have known better. First, congressional behavior is always tough to predict, and the current band of wayward miscreants who control the House are fixated on defying all historical antecedents. After all, this is the same crowd that gleefully pleaded with John Boehner (who surely is somewhere with an enormous grin on his face and a merlot in his hand) to shut down the government. The same crowd that proclaimed how wonderful it would be to default on the national debt: who refused to vote for continuing resolutions or stimulus bills or any other urgent legislation because they worship at the shrine of chaos, not to mention practice the dark art of ineptitude.

Since the Republicans bulldozed their way to the majority in 2010, I have described their behavior as bizarrely Orwellian. Failure=success: allowing (even encouraging) government to fail is an achievement, because it promotes the broader objective: to destroy peoples’ confidence in government. Now, with the collapse of the “repeal and replace” (snicker) ACA movement, it is they, not government, who look indescribably incompetent, not because they failed to pass a bill, but because their inability to translate 7 years of buffaloing the public into real legislation has exposed them as a bunch of hyperbolic windbags.

I mean, if you can’t kill off the law you’ve spent a solid 7 years trashing, with your governors refusing to create exchanges or accept Medicaid expansion dollars; if you’ve spend billions on political campaigns begging the American people to elect a unified Republican government to end the “abomination of Obamacare”; if you’ve had a narcissistic blowhard waving his Executive wand for two months pretending to be King Donald I – you’ve got all that going for you and you still crash and burn – and I mean, spectacularly crash and burn – on your first serious legislative outing: well, what else can you say except, “You’ve been exposed as frauds.” Not to mention, amateurs.

Give them credit, they did achieve something Barack Obama never could: they made people appreciate the Affordable Care Act. Perversely, their focus on the law’s protections and benefits reversed the public hostility to the law. Now, the public wants ACA left as it is by a 3-1 margin. Even Republican politicians can count those numbers, not that they weren’t tempted to make them even worse. The photograph of a large group of white men sitting around the table in the White House Cabinet Room dissecting the ACA and removing maternity benefits: come on!

Now this little band of wounded warriors can turn their attention to what always was the first goal of Republican politicians: cutting taxes for rich people and bumping up the national debt in order to create a rationale for additional cuts in domestic programs. But they may have done themselves in by exposing their meanspiritedness and mendacity. When they begin writing the budget resolution and appropriations bills, they will have not only the health care fiasco as a burden to carry, but also Trump’s egregiously stupid idea to slash Meals on Wheels, which uses religious charities, among others, to deliver nutritious food to homebound senior citizens. The inclusion of so malevolent an idea can easily obliterate every other message in a multi-trillion dollar budget simply because it gives you the keyhole to look into the values and morality of those composing the plan, and in this case, those values are contemptible. The annual budget to feel a home-bound senior through Meals on Wheels is probably less than a really nice Trumpian feast at Mar-a-Largo.

Perhaps the most serious political fallout will affect the relationship between Trump and Republicans in Congress, who are unlikely to grovel before his golden throne after this week’s demonstration of incompetence. His bluster surely did not help build a trusting relationship, particularly his threat to support primary opponents against those who dared to defy his edict.

The other big loser is Paul Ryan who learned the hard way that nothing has changed since the Freedom Caucus drop-kicked John Boehner out of the Speaker’s chair. Ryan made the mistake of trying to ride the tiger which, as John Kennedy once warned us, often consumes those who take such chances. The Senate Republicans are doubtless delighted with the outcome: Ryan’s stature is lowered, and they do not have to upset the base by tempering the House’s loony legislation (which the House probably wouldn’t have passed when it arrived back on the south side of the Capitol, unrecognizable, in a few months).

All in all, quite a good week. The Republicans can rest up a bit before the forthcoming April recess, which will bring a new round of harrowing town hall meetings with outraged constituents. At least the GOP representatives won’t have to explain why they voted to slash health benefits to women seeking mammograms or pregnant women seeking prenatal care. A silver lining in an otherwise grim forecast.

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